Archive for the ‘Press’ Category

 

Business Day, 27 March ’09

Fri, Mar 27th, 2009
Business Day – 27 March 2009

Business Day, 4 February 2009

Wed, Feb 4th, 2009

DNA tests for suspects broadly welcomed

The Star, Friday – 5 December 2008

Fri, Dec 5th, 2008

Cops’ fingerprint boost

The cabinet has given the green light to proposed changes to the law to allow the police to access databases holding the fingerprints of millions of citizens and foreigners, in a move to improve their ability to track down suspects and boost conviction rates.

The draft Criminal Law (Forensic Procedures) Amendment Bill is expected to come before parliament early next year, Justice Ministry spokesperson Zolile Nqayi said yesterday.

In addition to expanding police access to fingerprints, the draft bill will also increase their powers to take and store fingerprints and other “biometric materials” – and to establish a DNA database as a crime-fighting tool.

The SAPS has access only to fingerprints stored in its own database. The Criminal Procedure Act does not make it compulsory that fingerprints be taken, even when someone is convicted of an offence.

BY GAYE DAVIS

FSS Diagnostic Review of the SA FSL held in Pretoria

Mon, Jul 28th, 2008

In February 2008, the DNA Project, through the generous sponsorship of the Change a Life Mike Thomson Trust, sponsored the Forensic Science Services (“The FSS”) visit to SA to conduct a Diagnostic Review of the Forensic Science Lab in Pretoria. The purpose of the visit was to enable the FSS to better understand the current situation in SA and the vision of the future of forensic DNA in SA. Issues such as scene of crime requirements, legislative impact, technical processes, procedures and techniques currently used within the FSL, were explored. Currently, DNA analysis to support the South African Police Service (SAPS) is provided by 2 laboratories, Pretoria and Western Cape. The Pretoria unit is the largest and houses the National DNA Data-
base. The FSS were requested to undertake a review of the Pretoria Forensic Science Lab (FSL), Biology Unit (BU) to establish if anything could be done to improve the e?ciency and hence capacity of the DNA analytical process;  reduce the existing backlog; improve the contribution of the unit to the detection and conviction of o?enders and make recommendations for future development and expansion of the DNA Database.
The outcome of the Diagnostic Review by the FSS was a comprehensive ?ndings report with recommendations to support the enhancement of DNA processing in SA including a number of proposed solutions from the FSS to meet those recommendations. This report was submitted to the FSL following a presentation of the above ?ndings to the FSL in Pretoria, in July 2008.

Forensic Science Services (UK) visit SA – sponsored by The DNA Project

Fri, Mar 14th, 2008


Pictured above: Mr Alan Matthews (FSS UK Database Manager) and Director Joubert (Section Head, Biology, FSL) share information at the FSL in Pretoria

The Forensic Science Services (FSS) have just completed a week long visit to the SAPS Forensic Science Laboratory (FSL) in Pretoria, following completion of a diagnostic review at the FSL. The visit, arranged by Vanessa Lynch of The DNA Project, was specifically aimed to further improve the FSL’s current capabilities and capacities to conduct DNA forensic analyses, and for general forensic laboratory improvement.. The FSS in response to the DNA’s Project’s initiative, submitted a proposal to the DNA Project to conduct a Diagnostic Review within SA’s FSL to enable the FSS to better understand the current situation in SA and the vision of the future of forensic DNA in SA. Issues such as scene of crime requirements, legislative impact, technical processes, procedures and techniques currently used within the FSL, were explored. The outcome of the Diagnostic Review by the FSS will be a comprehensive and strategic findings report with recommendations to support the enhancement of DNA processing in SA including a number of proposed solutions from the FSS to meet those recommendations. The report will be rendered to the DNAP together with the FSL at the end of March 2008.

The FSS and its National DNA Database is considered worldwide, to be the benchmark of DNA Forensic practices and DNA Databasing. The Manager of the UK Database, Mr Alan Matthews confirmed that when the UK National DNA database (NDNAD) was launched in 1995 it was anticipated that 35,000 DNA reference samples would be processed in the first year. The reality was that the UK police submitted over 135,000 samples. This showed the perceived value this ‘new’ forensic tool had to assist the police and Criminal Justice Systems with criminal investigations. In order to achieve this, a strategic approach was taken which required by the co-operation of the FSS, Police & the National Police Training Centre (NPTC) as well as the Home Office. This partnership was designed to:

Increase the police submissions of DNA samples from crime scenes and suspects

Increase the quality of police submissions

Decrease the number of samples being rejected for administrative failures

Decrease the number of DNA samples failing to give DNA profile

Increase the understanding of the need for proper packaging, storage and chain of custody

of DNA evidence

Increase the police understanding of legislative issues and the changed police processes

• ensure the Rapid development in the size of the National DNA Database

Increase the impact of DNA profiling on crime detection and clear up rates

The above action made a significant impact on crime. Every week in the UK suspects arrested for relatively minor crimes are being matched, by the use of the NDNAD, to DNA evidential material recovered from undetected homicides and serious sexual offences. The investigative power of these techniques cannot be ignored. Vanessa Lynch of the DNA Project, recognizing the significant contribution the FSS’s historical journey san make to alleviating crime in SA, is exploring a proposal by the FSS proposes to make this expertise available to the South African Police Service working in partnership to design and deliver an equivalent training programme. To this end, the DNA Project seeks to effect change at Crime Scene level by the implementation of a “Training Bus” – The DNA Project is investigating the development of a “training bus” to handle training of lower level police officers in the handling of a crime scene (where currently a large majority of crucial evidence is lost). The FSS training teams developed mobile training solutions which toured major police sites over 18 months allowing ‘First Attending’ police officers and other specialists access to the training materials and the DNA ‘experts’. These solutions included the provision of a mobile classroom based on a 7.5 tonne truck and the provision of a suite of laptop computers to provide a ‘fixed’ classroom environment.

Whilst in Pretoria performing the Diagnostic Review, Mr Allan Matthews, the International Business Director for the FSS, gave an informative dialogue in which he illustrated how the use of the UK’s National DNA Database has translated into thousands of crimes solved and offenders convicted as a result f the above co-ordinated approach in the UK. In the longer term, as a result of the introduction of DNA profiling and the power of the NDNAD, the UK has seen a significant impact on overall crime rates, particularly in those offences classified as volume crime (burglary and car crime). Every week in the UK suspects arrested for relatively minor crimes are being matched, by the use of the NDNAD, to DNA evidential material recovered from undetected homicides and serious sexual offences. The investigative power of these techniques cannot be ignored.

Vanessa Lynch also held in depth discussions with a senior State Attorney, key role players within the Forensic Science Laboratory as well as the Manager if the UK DNA Database, Mr Alan Matthews to discuss ways in which the DNAP can help lobby support for legislative changes. The FSS to this end, will provide the DNAP with recommendations, based on the UK’s journey through no less than 6 (six) legislation amendments over the past 15 years, which allowed for the regulated and judicious management of the DNA Database in the UK. Issues such as sample retention, use of profiles and database searching are all being addressed in order to ensure compliance with Human Right Issues as well as restrict use of the DNA database to criminal intelligence. These efforts need to be supported by collating all the research being done, drawing a proposal for submission to the SA Law Commission Review and ensuring that the public lobby support for this initiative.

The FSS is an internationally renowned centre of excellence for casework, research, training and consultancy. It has assisted over 60 countries in the field of forensic science. FSS experts visit forensic facilities overseas, to review work practices, advise on the latest technology and promote the implementation of techniques validated in its own laboratories. It has over 2,500 employees based across the UK and the FSS has six sites that process DNA samples for casework, with three sites that deliver specifically to the UK NDNAD. The three DNA profiling units for the UK NDNAD have state of the art automation facilities to ensure the most efficient processing of samples.

The UK’s National DNA Database® was the first of its kind in the world and has received widespread acknowledgement as the most important advance since fingerprinting in the prevention and detection of crime. It is a dynamic database, as profiles are constantly added to it. The Forensic Science Service® is contracted to run The National DNA Database® on behalf of the Home Office. Following requests from other countries the FSS has produced database software (FSS-iD™) based on its experience running and developing the UK database.

For more on the FSS visit http://www.forensic.gov.uk/

DNA equipment donation boosts fight against crime

Thu, Nov 29th, 2007

CAPE TIMES
November 29, 2007 Edition 2

by BLISS BARBER

A RECENT donation of DNA profiling equipment valued at R232 000 will see criminal investigators in Cape Town moving forward in forensic analysis and the fight against crime, officials said.

Yesterday afternoon project leader and founder of the DNA Project, Vanessa Lynch, joined senior superintendent of the Western Cape Forensic Science Lab, Mafiki Maluleke, in a ceremonial handing over of forensic equipment to the laboratory in Bellville.

The lab was the second to receive a donation from the organisation, which was formed by Lynch after evidence in her father’s murder investigation three and a half years ago was mishandled by police.

“I recognised that there were shortfalls, and I wanted to address these shortfalls with a constructive approach,” said Lynch. She said it was important to make “tangible” progress at the “operational level,” beginning with the lab workers forced to do “the best they can with the little they have”.

The contribution included a GeneAmp designed for DNA replication, blood spatter analysis software, an autoclave used for sterilisation, auto-controlled measurement pipettes, a digital camera and data verification kit for cataloguing pictures of legally recognisable evidence, and a microcentrifuge for substance separation.

pictured above: Snr Supt. Mafiki Maluleke, DNA Project Leader, Vanessa Lynch & DNA Project Assistant, Margaret McEwan with the GeneAmp

According to Maluleke, the current backlog of cases that require forensic analysis before appearing in court is about 600. “This donation will help us put in more cases than we would have been able to,” he said.

“Already we can see where these donations have made a difference. Four analysts would have to wait in line to process evidence before the equipment was given. And things like the autoclave make their instruments immediately available to them,” she said.

Thanking her on behalf of SA Forensic Science Lab management, he called the donations a gift for the “community of South Africa” as a whole.

In a recent success for the DNA Project, Lynch’s proposal to bring teams of scientists from the Forensic Science Services in the UK,  to the facility in Pretoria for assessment has been accepted. Their database in the UK processes some 40 000 reference samples per month. The trip will be sponsored by the DNA Project.

Carte Blanche features The DNA Project

Sun, Sep 2nd, 2007

Carte Blanche featured the DNA Project on its show, on Sunday 2 September 2007. Carte Blanche, through the efforts of DNA Project leader Vanessa Lynch, visited the prestigious FSS in the UK, Birmingham, where together, they were able to film the DNA Labs in action as well as interview key people within the FSS. Following the visits to the UK lab, Vanessa Lynch visited the NFI in Holland and met with the Dutch DNA Database Manager who told Vanessa It was not only part of his job but also a pleasure to receive her at the NFI. He went on to commend her devotion to the application of DNA-testing to solve crimes in South Africa, which he described as admirable and deserving of assistance.

Carte Blanche gave a brief outline of how the DNA Project started, and Rob Matthews and Vanessa Lynch shared their stories of tragedy and growth through the DNA Project. Thereafter the programme explored the use of DNA Profiling in crime resolution throughout the world and how this can be achieved in South Africa through the objectives of the DNA Project. Issues such as legislation changes, funding additional equipment, training and receiving outside assistance from institutions such as the FSS, were covered. Following the Carte Blanche program, The DNA Project has been overwhelmed by the flood of responses and offers of support, ranging from legal input, funding, raising awareness and innovative ideas, to name a few.

If you wish to read a transcript of the show, go to http://www.carteblanche.co.za/display/Display.asp?Id=3379