SAPS Forensic Services: Available posts – August 2014

July 29th, 2014

SAPS Forensic Services

New posts within the South African Police Service (SAPS) Forensic Services Division, under the SAPS Act (employment as a police official) and Public Service Act (employment as a civilian employee), have been added to their website and are currently being advertised – http://www.saps.gov.za/careers/careers.php.

Please Note: Police officials are employed in terms of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No 68 of 1995) and civilian employees are employed in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 (Act No 103 of 1994).

CLOSING DATE for all applications: 08 AUGUST 2014

POLICE ACT POSTS

Click here to read the application process in terms of the SAPS Act.

Please download the full advertisement for all the new SAPS Act posts, including full requirements, core responsibilities, salary level and how to apply (PDF).

Download the official application form from the SAPS website.

The following posts are available:

1. Post: Major (Chief Forensic Analyst)
Sub Section Commander: Mechanical & Metallurgical Engineering
Section: Ballistics
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Western Cape: Plattekloof (1 Post) (Ref FS 84/2014)

2. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)
Commander: Metallurgical Engineering
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Section: Ballistics
Location of the post: Western Cape: Plattekloof (1 Post) (Ref FS 85/2014)

3. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)
Sub-Section: Fire Investigation: Chemistry Investigation
Section: Chemistry
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Silverton: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 86/2014)

4. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)
Sub-Section: Facial Identification: Local Criminal Record Centre
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Secunda: Mpumalanga (1 Post) (Ref FS 87/2014)

5. Post: Warrant Officer (Forensic Analyst)
Component: Quality Management
Sub-Section: Environmental Compliance: Regional Laboratory
Location of the post:

  • Ballistics: Eastern Cape: Port Elizabeth [1 post] (Ref FS 88/2014)
  • Biology: Eastern Cape: Port Elizabeth [1 post] (Ref FS 89/2014)

6. Post: Constable
Sub Section: Crime Scene Investigation: Local Criminal Record Centre
Component: Criminal Record & Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Lydenburg: Mpumalanga (1 Post) (Ref FS 90/2014)

PUBLIC SERVICE ACT POSTS

People who do not want to become police officials but who would like to work for the South African Police Service as civilian employees, may apply for vacant positions. Click here to read the application process in terms of the Public Service Act.

Please download the full advertisement for all the new Public Service Act posts, including full requirements, core responsibilities, salary level and how to apply (PDF).

Download the official application form from the SAPS website.

The following posts are available:

1. Post: Secretary
Division: Forensic Services
Location of the post:

  • Provincial Head: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Western Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 91/2014)
  • Section Head: Questioned Documents: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 92/2014)
  • Component Head: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 93/2014)

2. Post: Data Typist
Sub-Section: Adjudication: Local Criminal Record Centre
Section: Criminalistic Bureau: Local Criminal Record Centre
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post:

  • Musina: Limpopo (2 Posts) (Ref FS 94/2014)
  • Ladysmith: Kwazulu-Natal (1 Post) (Ref FS 95/2014)
  • Lichtenburg: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 96/2014)
  • Queenstown: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 97/2014)
  • Mthatha: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 98/2014)

3. Post: Administration Clerk
Sub-Section: Local Criminal Record Centre
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post:

  • Cradock: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 99/2014)
  • Bellville: Western Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 100/2014)

4. Post: Accounting Clerk
Sub-Section: Nodal Support Centre
Section: Provincial: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Northern Cape
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Kimberley: Northern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 101/2014)

5. Post: Personnel Officer
Sub-Section: Nodal Support Centre
Section: Provincial: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Eastern Cape
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: King Williams Town: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 102/2014)

6. Post: Provisioning Administration Clerk
Sub-Section: Nodal Support Centre
Section:

  • Provincial: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Kwazulu-Natal
  • Provincial: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Eastern Cape

Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post:

  • Durban: Kwazulu-Natal (1 Post) (Ref FS 103/2014)
  • King Williams Town: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 104/2014)

7. Post: Administration Clerk
Section: Victim Identification Centre
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 105/2014)

GENERAL:

  • Only the official application form (available on the SAPS website and at SAPS recruitment offices) will be accepted. The Z83 previously utilized will no longer be accepted. All instructions on the application form must be adhered to and previous criminal convictions must be declared. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the application.
  • The post particulars and reference number of the post must be correctly specified on the application form.
  • Persons who retired from the Public Service by taking a severance package, early retirement or for medical reasons, as well as persons with previous convictions, are excluded.
  • A comprehensive Curriculum Vitae must be submitted together with the application form.
  • Certified copies (certification preferably by Police Officers) of an applicant’s ID document, motor vehicle drivers license (Police Act appointments), Senior Certificate and all educational qualifications obtained and service certificates of previous employers stating the occupation and the period, must also be submitted and attached to every application.
  • APPLICANTS ARE REQUESTED TO INITIAL EACH AND EVERY PAGE OF THE APPLICATION FORM, INCLUDING THE CURRICULUM VITAE (CV) AND ALL ANNEXURES THAT ARE ATTACHED.
  • The copies must be correctly certified on the copy itself, not at the back. The certification must not be older than three months.
  • All qualifications and driver’s licenses submitted will be subjected to verification checking with the relevant institutions. The South African Police Service will verify the residential address of applicants and conduct reference checks.
  • Applications must be mailed timeously. Late applications will not be accepted or considered.
  • The closing date for the applications is 8th of August 2014.
  • Appointments will be made in terms of the SAPS Act or Public Service Act as applicable to the post environment.
  • If a candidate is short-listed, it can be expected of him/her to undergo a personal interview.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to a medical assessment by a medical practitioner as determined by SAPS prescripts.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to undergo a lateral entry programme at a SAPS training institution, where applicable.
  • Short-listed candidates for appointment to certain identified posts, will be vetted in terms of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2007 (Act No 32 of 2007) and the Children’s Act, 2005 (Act No 38 of 2005). A candidate, whose particulars appear in either the National Register for Sex Offenders or Part B of the Child Protection Register, will be disqualified from appointment to that post.
  • All short-listed candidates will be subjected to fingerprint screening.
  • Correspondence will be conducted with successful candidates only. If you have not been contacted within three (3) months after the closing date of this advertisement, please accept that your application was unsuccessful.
  • The South African Police Service is under no obligation to fill a post after the advertisement thereof.
  • The South African Police Service is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and it is the intention to promote representivity in the Public Service through the filling of these posts. Persons whose transfer/appointment/promotion will promote representivity will therefore receive preference.

Applications and enquiries can be directed to:
Lt Colonel Klopper / Lt Moonsamy
Tel: (012) 421-0194
Tel: (012) 421-0584

Postal Address:
Private Bag X 322
PRETORIA
0001

Hand Delivery:
Cnr Beckett and Pretorius Street
Strelitzia Building
Arcadia
0083

Forensic Pathology in South Africa

July 25th, 2014

What is forensic pathology?

Forensic pathology is a sub-specialty of pathology that focuses on determining the cause of death by examining a corpse.

South Africa’s Forensic Pathology Service

The Forensic Pathology Service falls under the Department of Health and deals with all cases of unnatural and unexplained deaths. Many of the unexplained death cases turn out to be due to natural causes, such as undiagnosed heart disease or an infection.

What does a forensic pathologist do?

Post-mortem examinations

Assisted by a Forensic Pathology Officer, the pathologist examines dead individuals to accurately establish their identity, the day of death and the cause of death.

They consider the body of the deceased to be a crime scene that they, as medical detectives, process in order to find and preserve evidence to present in future court evidence.

External examination

This reveals tell-tale signs on clothing, such as blood spatter or gunshot soot.

The deceased’s body may exhibit signs of a medical condition such as emaciation, indicating a severe disease like cancer or AIDS.

The body is examined from top to toe and special test samples can be taken to assist in a variety of ways:  toxicological analysis, microbiology to identify infections, chemical analysis, anthropology, odontology – the list of possibilities is very long.

A full body Lodox X-ray image in the case of multiple gunshots. Many of the white spots are bullets but some are metal press studs of the jeans the deceased was wearing. Red indicate the bullets. The yellow rectangle encircles the press studs.

In the Western Cape two of the big mortuaries have Lodox X-ray machines, which we use to do a full body X-ray. Other mortuaries have access to X-ray facilities at government hospitals. This assists hugely in many cases.

For example, where to look for the bullets in a body.

Once located, these bullets will be retrieved and examined by ballistic experts to match them to the murder weapon.

Internal examination

After the external examination, the internal examination is done by removing the chest and abdominal organs and the brain. Earn organ is examined individually and weighed.

Samples for microscopic and toxicological examination can be taken.

DNA samples may assist in identifying the deceased and/or the murderer.

In some instances, a natural disease process is discovered, which means further criminal investigation is not necessary. The finding may be very important for the relatives of the deceased, to come to understand the death and maybe even have themselves tested for risk factors.

Apart from doing autopsies, forensic pathologists are kept busy in many ways:

  • Going to scenes of death when requested by police investigators.
  • Compilation of autopsy reports.
  • Special investigations, for example microscopic examination of organ sections.
  • Drafting medical opinions on cause of death for the court.
  • Giving testimony in court.
  • Advising relatives of the deceased of possible familial disease so that they can go for a check-up and preventive treatment.
  • Teaching undergraduate and postgraduate medical students, lawyers and forensic pathology officers.
  • Research.

Who helps the forensic pathologist at the mortuary?

The forensic pathology officer, who is trained on the job. These officers are not medically qualified, but are taught how to assist. They need a Grade 10, a valid driver’s licence and the ability to work respectfully with living and dead people.

Forensic Pathology Officer

How do you become a forensic pathologist in South Africa?

  • This is a summary of qualifications and time required to become a forensic pathologist:
  • Matric/Grade 12/Umalusi with recommended subjects such as Life Science, Physical Science, Mathematics and English.
  • Six years of medical school.
  • One year of internship under supervision.
  • Two years of COSMOS (community service medical officer service).
  • Four years of registrar training at a medical school.

The above information was extracted from an article originally published in QUEST (2012) by Linda Liebenberg. To read the full article please click here.

Where can I study forensic pathology?

Additional information:

A UCT TV/Stepping Stones Production documentary on the Forensic Pathology Institute in Cape Town.

What is Forensic Entomology?

July 14th, 2014

Forensic science is a discipline that deals with expert scientific evidence relevant to legal cases. It ranges from the more familiar topics of ballistics and blood-stain analysis to esoteric specialities like pigment analysis and forensic botany.

Life cycle of the blowfly

Forensic entomology concerns legal evidence provided by insects.

Just as law is concerned not only with murders, forensic entomology is broad in scope. In fact, it can be subdivided into four arenas: medico-legal forensic entomology is the one most familiar to the public, while urban, stored product, and environmental forensic entomology form the other specialities.

This classification is based on the communities of insects that are typically involved, but also tends to reflect the branches of law and the types of client that a forensic entomologist encounters.

Although the distinctions are somewhat artificial, they help to outline the diverse scope of this kind of work.

Urban forensic entomology

This branch of the discipline is broadly concerned with insects around people’s homes, and usually relates to issues governed by common law or civil law, so the clients are generally private individuals and small businesses. The overwhelming majority of insects in these cases are fly-by-night pests like borer beetles, termites, cockroaches, and mosquitoes, and the subject of the associated litigation might be the competence of fumigation companies and the sanitary practices of livestock owners.

Stored-product forensic entomology

This kind of forensic entomology relates to cases involving insects in stored products, such as food, woven materials, and timber. As in urban forensic entomology, the cases tend to fall under common or civil law and mostly concern pests, but the species are different, and the commercial interests are generally large companies rather than small businesses. The usual suspects are various grain-feeding beetles, clothes moths, and booklice.

Questions regularly asked by the public are along the lines of “Was the worm I found in my chocolate there when I bought it?” and “Was my woollen Persian carpet infested with clothes moths in the factory?” These cases rarely go to court, but insurance claims regarding infested or damaged consignments of valuable goods may warrant the involvement of lawyers and even magistrates.

Medico-legal forensic entomology

This field can be subdivided on the basis of whether civil or criminal law is relevant. Civil cases may include medical and veterinary malpractice as well as neglect by care-givers of children and the aged, who may acquire infestations through negligence. The civil clients are usually private persons, and the insects are generally blowflies and fleshflies.

Some cases may not even involve insects, however. Psychological cases of delusory parasitosis are sometimes brought to entomologists to deal with. These are cases where people are convinced they are infested with parasitic insects that no one else can detect. It takes careful entomological analysis to distinguish between illusory parasitosis (that is, imaginary parasitic infestations), entomophobia (fear of insects), and genuine infestations by various mites living in hair follicles and the epidermis.

The legal issue here is whether the person has a psychosis that requires commitment to an institution, or whether the medical profession has been incompetent in seeking the parasite. An entomologist can help to make this decision.

Where criminal law is pertinent, the discipline is distinguished as medico-criminal forensic entomology, which is the high-profile subject of public awareness. The client group encompasses accused criminals and the State. The routine CSI (Crime Scene Insects) are blowflies, fleshflies, and certain beetles and moths because a death is most often involved. The deaths are usually of humans, but poaching and stock theft can be investigated by similar entomological methods.

A less well-known component of this work is called forensic entomotoxicology, which relates to the detection of chemicals in corpses where insects as used as an investigative tool. Drugs and poisons affect the development and behaviours of insects and accumulate in their tissues, which can provide a rich source of evidence.

Environmental forensic entomology

Here, insects are used to monitor the natural environment for evidence of pollution and undesirable change, and can provide evidence for both civil and criminal cases. This type of forensic entomology is still in the process of gaining recognition as a distinct discipline, and has gained increasing popularity in detecting effects of humans on the environment, either accidental or deliberate. In particular, the science of environmental toxicology has won growing acceptance since the publication of Rachel Carson’s landmark book Silent Spring in 1962.

The processes of forensic entomology help police with evidence when they investigate deaths that have occurred. Based on an understanding of the decaying processes of a corpse, and knowledge of the living organisms that invade a corpse, experts are able to estimate the conditions in which the person or animal died.

Work in forensic entomology

Forensic entomologists have two tasks: they develop sources of evidence through academic research, and they apply evidence in particular cases as expert witnesses.

Being an expert witness does not necessarily mean appearing in court. In many civil cases where expert evidence is involved, the matter is settled out of court. In these instances, the evidence can have a direct bearing on whether the case needs to go to court.

The same is true of criminal cases, but here an expert witness can have another role as well. The forensic entomologist may, in some instances, not contribute direct evidence but rather uncover clues that lead the police to crucial discoveries.

In either of these situations, it helps to be good at puzzle solving.

Jobs for forensic entomologists have been scarce throughout the world, but the situation is changing as the science grows.

In South Africa, work as an expert witness in forensic entomology formed a component of a broader job in forensic science within the laboratories of the South African Police Service. Most other expert witnesses who provided entomological evidence to the South African legal system were employed in universities and other research institutions.

But changes in the modern employment market are emphasizing self-employment and entrepreneurship, and the range of clients interested in forensic entomology is widening so much that a career as a forensic consultant is becoming feasible.

Career paths

There are three ways to become a forensic entomologist in South Africa:

  • Obtain a university degree in science subjects including biology or chemistry, then join the South African Police Service and complete a broader training in forensic science in their laboratories. Afterwards, you could work for the State and you could specialize in entomological work that would be primarily medico-criminal.
  • Become a self-employed consultant in forensic entomology. The first step in this direction would be university training in applied entomology, preferably with a specialization in forensic entomology at the level of Master of Science or even a doctorate. The next step is to find work in a mixture of urban, stored-product, medico-legal, and environmental cases for State, private, and commercial clients. A business-orientated way of thinking is a vital asset in taking the consultant route.
  • A third path lies between self-employment and becoming a police scientist. It, too, entails university training in entomology or zoology, normally to the doctoral level, then joining a university or research institute and doing other things (such as teaching or research) in addition to forensic work. One can even specialize in research on forensic entomology, rather than undertaking case work.

Where to study

Forensic entomology is a fascinating subject and, far from being limited to solving murders, it can bring science to bear on a surprising array of commercial, social, and environmental problems. The growth of the subject throughout the world makes it international, while its expansion into new areas of law offers new scientific challenges to provide precise and legally reliable evidence.

The above information was extracted from an article originally published in QUEST (2006) by Martin Villet and Nikite Muller. To read the full article please click here.

Additional website

SciShow – CSI Special Insects Unit: Forensic Entomology

SciShow’s Michael Aranda walks you through the crime-fighting science of forensic entomology, the study of insects used in criminal investigations.

SAPS Forensic Services: Available posts – July 2014

July 2nd, 2014

SAPS Forensic Services stand at the 2nd National Forensic Services Conference held in 2014

New posts within the South African Police Service (SAPS) Forensic Services Division, under the SAPS Act (employment as a police official), have been added to their website and are currently being advertised – http://www.saps.gov.za/careers/careers.php.

Please Note: Police officials are employed in terms of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No 68 of 1995). Click here to read the application process in terms of the SAPS Act.

CLOSING DATE for applications: 11 July 2014

Please download the full advertisement for all the new forensic services posts, including full requirements, core responsibilities, salary level and how to apply (PDF).

Download the official application form from the SAPS website.

The following posts are available:

1. Post: Colonel

Section Commander: Forensic Psychology
Section: Investigative Psychology
Component: Criminal Record & Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 43/2014)

2. Post: Major

Commander: Crime Scene Laboratories: Local Criminal Record Centre
Section: Provincial: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management: Gauteng
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Johannesburg: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 44/2014)

3. Post: Major

Commander: Case Administration
Section: Chemistry
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 45/2014)

4. Post: Major

Commander: Chemical Analysis
Section: Regional Laboratory: Eastern Cape
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Port Elizabeth: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 46/2014)

5. Post: Major

Commander: Routine DNA Case Review
Section: Biology
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 47/2014)

6. Post: Major

Commander: DNA Reporting Officers
Section: Biology
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 48/2014)

7. Post: Major

Commander: Case Management
Section: Ballistics
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 49/2014)

8. Post: Major

Commander: Ballistics Analysis
Section: Ballistics
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 50/2014)

9. Post: Major

Commander: Primer Residue Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 51/2014)

10. Post: Major

Commander: Organic Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 52/2014)

11. Post: Major

Commander: Biology: Quality Management
Section: Regional Quality Management
Component: Quality Management
Location of the post: Plattekloof: Western Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 53/2014)

12. Post: Lieutenant

Sub-Section: Chemical Processing
Section: Crime Scene Laboratories
Component: Criminal Record & Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: National Office: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 54/2014)

13. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)

Sub Section: DNA Serial Casework
Section: Biology
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 55/2014)

14. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)

Sub Section: Organic Analysis: Material Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 56/2014)

15. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)

Sub Section: Precious Metals Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 57/2014)

16. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)

Sub Section: Environmental Compliance: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Section: Quality Management: Crime Scene Management / LCRC’s
Component: Quality Management
Location of the post: Kimberley: Northern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 58/2014)

17. Post: Senior Forensic Analyst (Lieutenant)

Sub Section: Quality Assurance: Crime Scene Laboratories
Section: Quality Management: CR & CSM
Component: Quality Management
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 59/2014)

18. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Section: Chemical Processing: Crime Scene Laboratories
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: National Office: Pretoria (2 Posts) (Ref FS 60/2014)

19. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Section: Crime Scene Laboratories
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post:

  • National Office:Pretoria (2 Posts) (Ref FS 61/2014)
  • Vereeniging: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 62/2014)
  • Mmabatho: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 63/2014)
  • Kimberley: Northern Cape (2 Posts) (Ref FS 64/2014)
  • Springbok: Northern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 65/2014)
  • Port Alfred: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 66/2014)
  • Mount Road: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 67/2014)
  • Mthatha: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 68/2014)
  • Park Road: Free state (2 Posts) (Ref FS 69/2014)
  • Mitchells Plain: Western Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 70/2014)

20. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Sub-Section: Evidence Recovery
Section: Biology
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Port Elizabeth: Eastern Cape (1 Post) (Ref FS 71/2014)

21. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Sub-Section: DNA Analysis
Section: Biology
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Plattekloof: Western Cape (4 Posts) (Ref FS 72/2014)

22. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Sub-Section: Ballistics Analysis
Section: Ballistics
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post:

  • Silverton: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 73/2014)
  • Port Elizabeth: Eastern Cape (2 Posts) (Ref FS 74/2014)
  • Plattekloof: Western Cape (2 Posts) (Ref FS 75/2014)

23. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Sub Section: Microscopy: Trace Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Silverton: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 76/2014)

24. Post: Forensic Analyst (Warrant Officer)

Sub Section: Profiling: Material Analysis
Section: Scientific Analysis
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Silverton: Pretoria (1 Post) (Ref FS 77/2014)

GENERAL:

  • Only the official application form (available on the SAPS website and at SAPS recruitment offices) will be accepted. The Z83 previously utilized will no longer be accepted. All instructions on the application form must be adhered to and previous criminal convictions must be declared. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the application.
  • The post particulars and reference number of the post must be correctly specified on the application form.
  • Persons who retired from the Public Service by taking a severance package, early retirement or for medical reasons, as well as persons with previous convictions, are excluded.
  • A comprehensive Curriculum Vitae must be submitted together with the application form.
  • Certified copies (certification preferably by Police Officers) of an applicant’s ID document, motor vehicle drivers license (Police Act appointments), Senior Certificate and all educational qualifications obtained and service certificates of previous employers stating the occupation and the period, must also be submitted and attached to every application.
  • APPLICANTS ARE REQUESTED TO INITIAL EACH AND EVERY PAGE OF THE APPLICATION FORM, INCLUDING THE CURRICULUM VITAE (CV) AND ALL ANNEXURES THAT ARE ATTACHED.
  • The copies must be correctly certified on the copy itself, not at the back. The certification must not be older than three months.
  • All qualifications and driver’s licenses submitted will be subjected to verification checking with the relevant institutions. The South African Police Service will verify the residential address of applicants and conduct reference checks.
  • Applications must be mailed timeously. Late applications will not be accepted or considered.
  • The closing date for the applications is 11th of July 2014.
  • Appointments will be made in terms of the SAPS Act or Public Service Act as applicable to the post environment.
  • If a candidate is short-listed, it can be expected of him/her to undergo a personal interview.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to a medical assessment by a medical practitioner as determined by SAPS prescripts.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to undergo a lateral entry programme at a SAPS training institution, where applicable.
  • Short-listed candidates for appointment to certain identified posts, will be vetted in terms of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2007 (Act No 32 of 2007) and the Children’s Act, 2005 (Act No 38 of 2005). A candidate, whose particulars appear in either the National Register for Sex Offenders or Part B of the Child Protection Register, will be disqualified from appointment to that post.
  • All short-listed candidates will be subjected to fingerprint screening.
  • Correspondence will be conducted with successful candidates only. If you have not been contacted within three (3) months after the closing date of this advertisement, please accept that your application was unsuccessful.
  • The South African Police Service is under no obligation to fill a post after the advertisement thereof.
  • The South African Police Service is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and it is the intention to promote representivity in the Public Service through the filling of these posts. Persons whose transfer/appointment/promotion will promote representivity will therefore receive preference.

Applications and enquiries can be directed to:
Lt Colonel Klopper / Lt Moonsamy
Tel: (012) 421-0194
Tel: (012) 421-0584

Postal Address:
Private Bag X 322
PRETORIA
0001

Hand Delivery:
Cnr Beckett and Pretorius Street
Strelitzia Building
Arcadia
0083

How SAPS forensic teams examine a crime scene

June 23rd, 2014

Evidence collected and analysed at the scene of a crime can make or break a case.

To help understand the important roles of the various SAPS personnel, the following adaptation of an article first published online on the 12th March 2014, by Petro-Anne Vlok & Christiaan Boonzaier, looks at how the forensic teams go about their work when processing a crime scene.

SAPS officer taping off a crime scene.

1. First member

  • When called out to a possible murder, the first police officer on the scene, called the first member, assesses if the victim is still alive. If so, the chief priority is to preserve life.
  • If the victim is dead, the officer secures the crime scene using SAPS-identifying tape. Officers are stationed to prevent unauthorised access.

Crime Scene Manager - This person is in charge of the crime scene.

2. Crime scene manager

  • The forensic department’s crime scene manager (CSM) relieves the first member. The CSM takes control of and responsibility for the scene and assigns crime scene technicians and an investigating officer (IO).
  • Next is the planning phase. The CSM, crime scene technicians and IO take a “first walk” through the crime scene, noting possible routes used by the victim or perpetrator as well as spotting what can be collected as evidence. They must take care not to disturb any evidence.
  • The CSM decides which experts and forensic resources are needed and the order in which the scene should be investigated.

3. Photographer

  • Before anyone may touch anything a photographer has to document the scene. Sometimes video documentation is also used or crime scene technicians make sketches.
  • 3D total station scanners are relatively new and effective documenting tools which take 3D images of the scene.

Crime Scene Expert - This person works inside the crime scene collecting evidence.

4. Crime scene technicians

  • They go through the scene with a fine-tooth comb. Because of the high crime rate in SA, crime scene technicians are often unavailable, in which case the IO collects evidence.
  • Technicians often use fluorescent light when searching for DNA samples. Blood, urine, semen and vomit show up in a bluish colour, even if the perpetrator tried to wash it off. UV light can help technicians see evidence hidden from the naked eye such as fingerprints, fibres and bruises on bodies.
  • Technicians are expected to keep meticulous records and note the date, time and place where evidence was collected.  Memory is fallible and wouldn’t hold up under cross-examination in court. Technicians have to label evidence as soon as they bag it.
  • After evidence has been collected on and around the victim, the body is taken to the morgue for further investigation by a forensic pathologist. Bags are placed over the hands and feet to preserve potential DNA evidence under the nails.
  • All collected evidence is preserved in evidence collection kits and sent to the forensic science laboratory for analysis.

Marking the scene

Coloured cones are placed throughout the crime scene to mark where evidence was collected. Each crime scene is different but technicians can, for example, place yellow cones next to blood evidence. The cones are also used to map the crime scene.

What is collected as evidence?

  • Trace evidence: gunshot residue, paint residue, broken glass, unknown chemicals
  • Bodily fluids: blood, semen, saliva, vomit
  • Impressions: fingerprints, footprints, tool marks
  • Weapons and firearms: knives, guns, bullet holes, cartridge casings
  • Documents and devices: diaries, suicide notes, computers, cellphones, memory sticks
  • Hair and fibres

Diagram depicting where various items of evidence are sent for analysis.

Murder in Miniature

June 12th, 2014

One woman’s ghastly dollhouse dioramas turned crime scene investigation into a science writes Slate‘s Rachel Nuwer.

Bedroom view, from the Nutshell Dioramas, created by Frances Glessner Lee.

On Aug. 19, 1946, Dorothy Dennison left her house to walk to the local butcher’s shop. It was a Monday afternoon, and the high school student was on summer break. She arrived at the butcher’s shop around noon and purchased some hamburger steak, which her mom planned to fix for dinner that evening.

Hours passed, and Dorothy did not return home. Alarmed, her mother telephoned a neighbor and the butcher, but neither had any leads on where Dorothy could be. At 5:25 p.m., the mother phoned the police to report her daughter missing.

Days passed, but no clues emerged. Finally, on Friday, Officer Patrick Sullivan found her in the darkened home of a church rector who was on vacation. Behind shuttered windows and amid covered furniture, Dorothy lay on her back, dead.

Her arms and legs were spread, and a knife stuck out of her gut. Her white dress had been pulled open, exposing her chest, and bite marks covered her body and legs. Blood had seeped from wounds on her head, haloing her brown hair in a dark pool. She was still wearing the red hair bow and matching ballet slippers that she had left the house in on Monday.

At Maryland’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, I look down at Dorothy’s crumpled body, exactly as it was when Officer Sullivan found her at 4:15 p.m. on Aug. 23, 1946. Dorothy’s tragic end has been preserved forever in a bizarre miniature diorama that captures each physical detail surrounding her death.

Dorothy’s deathscape—dubbed the Parsonage Parlor—is one of 20 dollhouse crime scenes built by a woman named Frances Glessner Lee, nicknamed “the mother of forensic investigation.” Lee’s murder miniatures and pioneering work in criminal sciences forever changed the course of death investigations.

Lee, who went by the name Fanny, was born in 1878 to millionaire parents who made their money selling agricultural equipment. She grew up in Chicago and later said she suffered from a sheltered, lonely childhood. When Lee was 4 years old, her mother—also named Frances—recorded in her diary that her daughter had stated, “I have no company but my doll baby and God.” Along with her older brother, she was home-schooled in a fortresslike house that one architect described as “pathologically private.” Lee learned feminine skills such as sewing, embroidery, painting, and the art of miniatures from her mother and aunts, but at the same time had a fondness for Sherlock Holmes stories and medical texts.

Lee’s parents were firm believers that a woman’s place was in the home, so after her brother left for Harvard University, Lee’s requests to also attend school were rebuffed. As her father liked to say, “A lady doesn’t go to school.”

Thus began several decades of mounting bitterness and regret. Although she continued to harbor dreams of becoming a doctor or nurse—of “doing something in my lifetime that should be of significant value to the community,” as she later wrote—shortly before her 21st birthday, she married Blewett Lee, a lawyer and professor at Northwestern University. The couple had three children, but things soon fell apart and they divorced in 1914, which was a scandalous turn of events at the time.

Despite being free of an unhappy marriage, years passed before Lee could truly come into her own. She was dependent on her family for financial support, but in 1929, that began to change. Her brother passed away, and a few years later her mother followed him to the grave. In 1936, her father died, passing on the family fortune to his daughter.

Kitchen (from afar)

As her daughter-in-law later attested, Lee, meanwhile, had begun nursing a passion for forensics, inspired by one of her brother’s friends, George Burgess Magrath, who served as Boston’s medical examiner and was famously skilled at solving perplexing murder cases of the day. When Lee realized she was free to direct her energy and resources in whatever direction she chose, her thoughts immediately turned to the stories he had told, and to his complaints that murders too often went unsolved because detectives misinterpreted or tampered with evidence or coroners with no medical training botched autopsies. “Investigators used to do dumb things,” says Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the Maryland medical examiner’s office. “They would walk through blood, move bodies, and put their fingers through bullet holes in clothing.”

Lee decided to take it upon herself to reform the country’s legal medicine system. As a start, she donated money to Harvard to create a professorship for a legal medicine expert—which Magrath filled—and also created the George Burgess Magrath Library of Legal Medicine, which was soon followed by the country’s first forensic pathology program. Although Magrath passed away two years later, through her own research and outreach, Lee became regarded as an expert in the field. She never forgot her source of inspiration, however. As she wrote in a letter in 1951: “I found that no one … knew exactly what legal medicine was supposed to mean. … But fortunately with the skill, knowledge and training of Dr. Magrath to guide me (he, in turn, really started from scratch), I have been able to accomplish a good deal.”

Despite these successes, however, Lee felt that more was needed to teach students the emerging art of evidence gathering. It was impossible to bring them to crime scenes, so Lee decided to create her own miniature crime scenes to use for training. She called her creations the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “She came up with this idea, and then co-opted the feminine tradition of miniature-making to advance in this male-dominated field,” says Corinne May Botz, an artist and author of The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “Like Sherlock Holmes, she was setting a scene and creating something like a character study of the victims, and she went about doing this very much from a detached investigator’s point of view.”

The 20 models Lee created were based on actual crime scenes, and she chose only the most puzzling cases in order to test aspiring detectives’ powers of observation and logic. Moreover, many of the cases could not be solved by observing the crime scene alone, demonstrating the need to involve medical examiners and other scientific experts in the process of solving crimes. While some—like poor Dorothy Dennison—were most definitely the victims of foul play, others could have died of natural causes or suicide. It was up to the detectives to find out.

Lee spent $3,000 to $4,500 creating each model, and her obsessive attention to detail shows. Grime from countless unseen hands coats light switches and door handles in cheap motel rooms while contemporary 1940s and ’50s food products line kitchen shelves in more affluent homes. Calendars are turned to the correct month and year that victims died; tiny keys fit into doors that can actually be locked and unlocked; and even a fingernail-sized mousetrap works. A miniature rocking chair rocks exactly three times when it was pulled back to a 45-degree angle, to meet with specifications from the real-life crime scene. “She was nuts about the level of detail,” Goldfarb says.

As for the homicides themselves, Lee attended autopsies, visited crime scenes, and studied blood spatter patterns. She made sure that her corpses possessed the correct degree of bloat and discoloration and that the evidence she was portraying—whether the angle of a knife or the pooling of blood—matched the mysterious circumstances of the deaths. She depicted an eclectic array of mortal endings, from hangings to falls to fires to gas-oven suicides. She often portrayed victims who were far removed from her own experience in life, such as drunks, prostitutes, and the poor.

On the other hand, Botz points out that most of the victims are female, and many died in their homes. Gender and the home, of course, were major themes in Lee’s life. Some scenes hint at their creator’s personal life and interests, too. Like the room depicted in the Nutshell “Pink Bathroom,” Lee also had a pink bathroom in her home. She also enjoyed fish imagery—the wallpaper motif in that scene. “There was an interplay between factual documentation and imaginative fiction,” Botz says. “Her own biases came into play.”

For the larger items—the houses themselves, the roofs—Lee enlisted the help of her carpenter, who followed her specifications exactly. The roof of the “Barn” Nutshell, for example, came from pieces taken from a 200-year-old barn on Lee’s own property, ensuring that it was authentically weathered. With her carpenter’s help, she turned out up to three crime scenes per year.

Dark bathroom (tub)

“She’d have been less frustrated if she had been born today, but it’s lucky for us, because the models are a result of her own personal time and culture, of her Victorian sensibilities and its emphasis on domestic space and family life,” Botz says. “All of these things came together to shape the models.”

In 1945, Harvard installed the first of Lee’s models, and she began delivering biannual, weeklong seminars that used them as training tools. Lee was almost always the only woman in the room. After some initial reluctance, she came to be accepted. She wined and dined her new colleagues, and many of the detectives grew fond of her, sometimes referring to her as “Mother” and sending her Mother’s Day cards. She even became an honorary captain with the New Hampshire State Police, making her the first woman to join the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Most significantly, though, her work mattered. Careful evidence gathering became a quintessential part of investigations, and several states amended their legislation to require better-trained coroners and medical examiners. As Goldfarb says, “She made forensic investigation into a scientific process.”

Lee died in 1962 at the age of 83, and the endowment for the Harvard program ceased. The university shuttered its forensics program and put the Nutshells into storage. They were likely headed for the dumpster, when Harvard professor Russell Fisher accepted a job in Baltimore as Maryland’s chief medical examiner. He brought the Nutshells with him, and in 1968, began using them in teaching seminars. Today, they are permanently installed on the fourth floor of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, behind a door marked “Pathology Exhibit.” The Nutshells are still used as training tools in homicide seminars. “This is not a museum or a gallery, it’s still functional,” Goldfarb says of the exhibit. “Death doesn’t change.”

Lee has a dedicated and growing following. She was the inspiration behind the character Jessica Fletcher in Murder, She Wrote, and a CSI episode was inspired by her work. Recently, Guillermo del Toro contacted Botz about optioning the rights to create an HBO show about Lee.

Although the Nutshells are not available for public walk-ins, they do get plenty of visitors, ranging from detectives to artists to miniatures aficionados. Paging through a guest book kept on top of the “Three-Room Dwelling” Nutshell—a possible double-murder and suicide that includes an executed infant—a column asking for purpose of visit contains a range of answers, from “artistic curiosity” to “DMort3 Training” to “love.”

Now I, too, have stumbled upon Lee’s intriguing story and perplexing creations, thanks to a field trip organized by the New York–based Morbid Anatomy Library and Museum. Back at the Parsonage Parlor, I am still mulling over what happened to Dorothy. I try to put myself in the detective’s place, to imagine walking into the diorama as a 5-inch-tall figure, as Lee used to instruct of her trainees, and to use my senses to infer information about both Dorothy and her killer. Temperatures, Lee points out in the text contained below the Nutshell, exceeded 90 degrees that week. Dorothy’s body, accordingly, is beginning to show signs of decomposition, mirroring the now-rancid hamburger steak that neatly lies on a nearby chair along with her purse. The blood pooling around her head indicates that she died in that room, but there are no signs of struggle in the room. A hammer smeared with a trace of blood lies near Dorothy’s corpse, but then there’s the knife—which was the actual murder instrument?

Three-room dwelling (baby’s crib)

So was it the butcher who did it, or perhaps the parson, who was supposedly on vacation at the time? Or maybe a secret lover? Most likely, someone she knew lured her in, willingly, to her death, since the purse and meat placed on the chair indicate a casual, relaxed encounter. The bite marks and position of her body suggest a sexual assault, but only a postmortem analysis will reveal whether Dorothy was raped. The teeth marks might help identify her killer by comparing imprints with suspects’ dental records, and if Dorothy had been murdered today, genetic testing could lend clues about her killer’s identity. High-tech tests are not needed to solve this crime, however: According to a 1966 story published in the Harvard Crimson, there is a solution.

But as frustrating as that lingering mystery might be, the answers to the Nutshells are kept secret to preserve their usefulness as training tools. Unless we solve the crime ourselves, we are left to wonder, as I am still doing myself. “Wanting answers is natural,” Goldfarb says. “Everyone wants to know the answers.”

Simply answering the riddle, however, is not the point. As Lee once wrote herself, “The Nutshells Studies are not presented as crimes to be solved. Rather, they are designed as exercises in observing and evaluating indirect evidence, especially that which may have medical importance.”

Sometimes those observations can lead to a well-savored answer, but other times, more information—whether through an autopsy or interrogations—is needed. In other cases, the mystery cannot be solved with certainty, reflecting the grim reality of crime investigations. But whatever the circumstances, the investigator, Lee wrote, is tasked with “seeking only the facts—the Truth in a Nutshell.”

This article was first published by Slate on 9th of June 2014.

48 Hours – Students learn about Forensic Science

June 5th, 2014

SABC - 48 Hours

For all our young budding scientists out there interested in entering the fascinating world of forensics…

Watch as two Matric students gain insight into the diverse career field of Forensic Science, which incorporates crime scene investigation, court proceedings, digital forensics and lab work, in the following episode of SABC’s 48 Hours programme.

This episode (S05 – Episode 01) was first broadcast on 16th of October 2013 on SABC2.

48 Hours is an educational youth television show, designed to bring the world of careers to young South Africans. Two Matric pupils spend 48 hours with a professional on the job, take on basic chores while learning as much as possible and asking as many questions as possible!

DNA Analysis Exposes Flaws in an Inexact Forensic Science

May 29th, 2014

The following article and video documentary published by the New York Times on the 18th of May 2014 looks at how DNA analysis helped expose flaws in an inexact forensic technique.

Before DNA testing, prosecutors relied on less sophisticated forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis, to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was hair analysis?

In the late 1980s, DNA technology upended the world of forensics.  Genetic fingerprinting, as it was often called, was a powerful tool to win convictions, but it also revealed cracks in the criminal justice system: innocent people were in prison. And many of them had been convicted in part using older forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis.

Before DNA, when a hair was found at a crime scene, it was examined under a microscope and compared with hairs from a suspect.  Though crime lab analysts knew that two hairs couldn’t be matched with perfect accuracy, hair comparisons proved to be powerful evidence linking suspects to crimes. In court, some examiners and prosecutors were certain that they had a “match.” But DNA exonerations are now forcing the criminal justice system to confront the limitations of hair analysis.

The following Retro Report video documentary zeros in on microscopic hair analysis and how the advent of DNA analysis ultimately proved it to be not quite as flawless as people had been led to believe.

The DNA Revolution: Hair Analysis from Retro Report on Vimeo.

To read the full New York Times article please click here.

SAPS Forensic Services: Additional Posts for 2014

May 23rd, 2014

New additional posts within the South African Police Service (SAPS) Forensic Services Division, under the SAPS Act (employment as a police official), have been added and are being advertised – http://www.saps.gov.za/careers/careers.php.

Crime scene investigator searching for fingerprints

Police officials are employed in terms of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No 68 of 1995). Click here to read the application process in terms of the SAPS Act.

CLOSING DATE for applications: 06 June 2014

Download the full advertisement for all the new forensic services posts, including how to apply and requirements (PDF).

Download the official application form from the SAPS website.

The following posts are available:

Post: Warrant Officer [Forensic Analyst]
Section: Crime Scene Laboratories
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Klerksdorp: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 258/2013)
Protea Glen: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 259/2013)
Lyttelton: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 260/2013)
Phuthadijaba: Free State (1 Post) (Ref FS 261/2013)
Salary Level: Band B1Salary Notch R 212 286.00 (Per Annum)

Post: Warrant Officer
Section: Crime Scene Investigation
Component: Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management
Location of the post: Phokeng: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 262/2013)
Mmabatho: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 263/2013)
Butterworth: Eastern Cape (2 Posts) (Ref FS 264/2013)
Arconhoek: Mpumalanga (1 Post) (Ref FS 265/2013)
Pudimoe: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 266/2013)
Vryburg: North West (1 Post) (Ref FS 267/2013)
Provincial CR & CSM: Durban: Kwazulu-Natal (2 Posts) (Ref FS 268/2013)
Ulundi: Kwazulu-Natal (1 Post) (Ref FS 269/2013)
Richardsbay: Kwazulu- Natal (1 Post) (Ref FS 270/2013)
Dundee: Kwazulu- Natal (1 Post) (Ref FS 271/2013)
Pretoria Central: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 272/2013)
Provincial CR & CSM: Johannesburg: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 273/2013)
Krugersdorp: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 274/2013)
Phalaborwa: Limpopo (1 Post) (Ref FS 275/2013)
Groblersdal: Limpopo (1 Post) (Ref FS 276/2013)
Salary Level: BAND B Salary Notch R196 269 (Per Annum)

Post: Warrant Officer [Forensic Analyst]
Sub-Section: Post Mortem Data Collection
Section: Victim Identification Centre
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria (2 Posts) (Ref FS 277/2013)
Salary Level: Band B1Salary Notch R 212 286.00 (Per Annum)

Post: Warrant Officer [Forensic Analyst]
Section: Victim Identification Centre
Sub – Section: Ante Mortem Data Collection
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Pretoria: Gauteng (1 Post) (Ref FS 278/2013)
Salary Level: Band B1Salary Notch R 212 286.00 (Per Annum)

Post: Warrant Officer (Provisioning Administration Officer)
Sub-Section: Supply Chain Management: Moveable Government Property
Section: Nodal Support Centre (1 Post) (Ref FS 279/2013)
Component: Forensic Science Laboratory
Location of the post: Port Elizabeth: Eastern Cape
Salary Level: BAND B Salary Notch R196 269 (Per Annum)

GENERAL INFO:

  • Only the official application form (available on the SAPS website and at SAPS recruitment offices) will be accepted. The Z83 previously utilized will no longer be accepted. All instructions on the application form must be adhered to and previous criminal convictions must be declared. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the application.
  • The post particulars and reference number of the post must be correctly specified on the application form.
  • Persons who retired from the Public Service by taking a severance package, early retirement or for medical reasons, as well as persons with previous convictions, are excluded.
  • A comprehensive Curriculum Vitae must be submitted together with the application form.
  • Certified copies (certification preferably by Police Officers) of an applicant’s ID document, motor vehicle drivers license (Police Act appointments), Senior Certificate and all educational qualifications obtained and service certificates of previous employers stating the occupation and the period, must also be submitted and attached to every application.
  • Applicants are requested to initial each and every page of the application form, CV and annexures.
  • The copies must be correctly certified on the copy itself, not at the back. The certification must not be older than three months.
  • All qualifications and driver’s licenses submitted will be subjected to verification checking with the relevant institutions. The South African Police Service will verify the residential address of applicants and conduct reference checks.
  • Applications must be mailed timeously. Late applications will not be accepted or considered.
  • The closing date for the applications is 6th of June 2014.
  • Appointments will be made in terms of the SAPS Act or Public Service Act as applicable to the post environment.
  • If a candidate is short-listed, it can be expected of him/her to undergo a personal interview.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to a medical assessment by a medical practitioner as determined by SAPS prescripts.
  • Applicants appointed under the Police Service Act will be subjected to undergo a lateral entry programme at a SAPS training institution, where applicable.
  • Short-listed candidates for appointment to certain identified posts, will be vetted in terms of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2007 (Act No 32 of 2007) and the Children’s Act, 2005 (Act No 38 of 2005). A candidate, whose particulars appear in either the National Register for Sex Offenders or Part B of the Child Protection Register, will be disqualified from appointment to that post.
  • All short-listed candidates will be subjected to fingerprint screening.
  • Correspondence will be conducted with successful candidates only. If you have not been contacted within three (3) months after the closing date of this advertisement, please accept that your application was unsuccessful.
  • The South African Police Service is under no obligation to fill a post after the advertisement thereof.
  • The South African Police Service is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and it is the intention to promote representivity in the Public Service through the filling of these posts. Persons whose transfer/appointment/promotion will promote representivity will therefore receive preference.

APPLICATIONS AND ENQUIRIES CAN BE DIRECTED TO:
Lt Moonsamy / Captain Mashakane
Tel: (012) 421-0584/ 0194
Tel: (012) 421-0539

POSTAL ADDRESS
Private Bag X 322
PRETORIA
0001

HAND DELIVERY:
Cnr Beckett and Pretorius Street
Strelitzia Building
Arcadia
0083

Unacceptable delay in training police to take DNA Samples

May 21st, 2014

The article which appeared on Saturday 17 May 2014 in the Weekend Argus bears witness to the fact that the new DNA Act depends on effective and efficient implementation in order to be rendered as a potent tool in the fight against crime. Click here to read the full article.

It is disappointing when so many people have worked so hard to get to this point, only to be thwarted by a delay such as this – the agreement between the FSL and the Dept. of Health simply needs to be signed by the DG of the Health Dept. in order to allow the police to be trained to take samples from arrestees and convicted offenders. It is unacceptable that a simple signature prevents this from happening.

Come on Health Dept – it’s your turn now to take action! The sooner we can start collecting samples form arrestees and convicted offenders and load those resultant DNA profiles onto the database, the sooner we can identify serial offenders and prevent further crimes. We know that DNA evidence will lead to much speedier trials by securing convictions and will allow for the identification of serial rapists. BUT – each day we wait is another day we allow criminals to continue their rampage on the innocent.

Vanessa Lynch